Latest O'Neal News

List of 15 news stories.

  • Coffee and Conversation Slated for Thursday, August 3

    Enrolled and inquiring families are invited to a "Coffee and Conversation" to meet Head of Upper School Matt Jacobs.

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  • kindergarten art

    O’Neal Kindergarten Reads in Motion for Beach Week

    During the last days of school, the kindergarten classes carved out a “Beach Week”.
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  • Elementary School

    O’Neal Kindergarten Reads in Motion for Beach Week

    During the last days of school, the kindergarten classes carved out a “Beach Week”.
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  • Private School

    O’Neal Kindergarten Reads in Motion for Beach Week

    During the last days of school, the kindergarten classes carved out a “Beach Week”.
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  • Education Reading

    O’Neal Kindergarten Reads in Motion for Beach Week

    During the last days of school, the kindergarten classes carved out a “Beach Week”.
    Read More
  • Science Elementary Education

    O’Neal Kindergarten Reads in Motion for Beach Week

    During the last days of school, the kindergarten classes carved out a “Beach Week”.
    Read More
  • O’Neal Ninth Grade English Takes Others on Journey through “The Odyssey”

    Lulu Brase’s English 9 students had the opportunity to put life to Homer’s “Odyssey” with some project-based learning and interaction with school community visitors. 
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  • Elementary School

    O’Neal Ninth Grade English Takes Others on Journey through “The Odyssey”

    Lulu Brase’s English 9 students had the opportunity to put life to Homer’s “Odyssey” with some project-based learning and interaction with school community visitors. 
    Read More
  • High School Projects

    O’Neal Ninth Grade English Takes Others on Journey through “The Odyssey”

    Lulu Brase’s English 9 students had the opportunity to put life to Homer’s “Odyssey” with some project-based learning and interaction with school community visitors. 
    Read More
  • Project-based learning

    O’Neal Ninth Grade English Takes Others on Journey through “The Odyssey”

    Lulu Brase’s English 9 students had the opportunity to put life to Homer’s “Odyssey” with some project-based learning and interaction with school community visitors. 
    Read More
  • High School English

    O’Neal Ninth Grade English Takes Others on Journey through “The Odyssey”

    Lulu Brase’s English 9 students had the opportunity to put life to Homer’s “Odyssey” with some project-based learning and interaction with school community visitors. 
    Read More
  • students

    O’Neal Ninth Grade English Takes Others on Journey through “The Odyssey”

    Lulu Brase’s English 9 students had the opportunity to put life to Homer’s “Odyssey” with some project-based learning and interaction with school community visitors. 
    Read More
  • Hanna Fitzgerald Wins Statewide Poster Contest

     
    Congratulations to Hanna Fitzgerald on her 1st place award for the 2017/2018 North Carolina Outdoor Heritage Poster Contest.
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  • High School Art

    Hanna Fitzgerald Wins Statewide Poster Contest

     
    Congratulations to Hanna Fitzgerald on her 1st place award for the 2017/2018 North Carolina Outdoor Heritage Poster Contest.
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  • Head of School Baccalaureate Address 2017

    Head of School John Elmore delivers his Baccalaureate speech to the Class of 2017 on May 25, 2017.
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Archive

O'Neal Faculty Thoughts

List of 22 news stories.

  • Reading is the Greatest Gift

    Lynn Bowness, Librarian
    It is no coincidence that we celebrate so many reading related events throughout the year:  Children’s Book Week, Get Caught Reading Month, National Poetry Month, National Library Week, School Library Month, International Literacy Day, our very own O’Nealopoly in the Lower School, and the list goes on and on.  While these dates may not be on everyone’s radar unless, of course, you are a school librarian, READING is the focus and it deserves all of our attention and celebration.  
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  • Own Your Math

    Megan King, Middle School Math Teacher
    I have some friends and family members who will quickly hand me a bill at a restaurant and say something along the lines of "Oh, you're the math person, you figure out the bill," or even worse, "I'm terrible at math, you tell me how much I owe." Both of these statements always make me frustrated. Why is it socially acceptable for people to publicly denounce their own math ability when research has shown that there is no such thing as a "math brain"? Everyone is capable of learning math, even that math which is beyond the arithmetic of calculating how much each person owes towards a restaurant bill.
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  • Let's Get Uncomfortable

    Jennifer Isaacs, Upper School Math
    “Help me!  I can’t do it!”  I have heard this from my 2-year-old son trying to put on a sock, from my 5-year-old tying a double knot, from my 8-year-old practicing a new piano piece, and from my teenage students facing a challenging warm-up problem in class.  In each case, they are unable to cope with being uncomfortable.  Why – throughout our lives – are we so afraid of tasks that are difficult?  Why do we shy away from challenge and discomfort?  

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  • Finding Flow in Your Summer

    David Williamson, Upper School Biology / O'Neal Summer Fun Coordinator
    As an educator and a new parent, I have now checked enough boxes to be the recipient of two or three targeted SPAM emails a day.  These emails are advertising people or products claiming to have an answer to how I can bring happiness to my students and my daughter, while increasing learning at the same time.  This is an admirable and probably universal goal that people share, and although I doubt the answer is found by clicking suspicious links in an email, I do believe there are two principles that help us on this quest.
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  • Boyd Grayson

    Character: Then and Now

    Boyd Grayson, Middle School Science Teacher
    My great grandfather, Thomas Duckett Boyd, and his brother, David French Boyd, my great grand uncle, were presidents of LSU during the time period in which the University was officially named “Louisiana State University.” Their terms of office ranged from 1865 to 1926. A book was published in 1935 titled “Thomas Duckett Boyd: The Story of a Southern Educator.” During his tenure as president, Thomas kept a very detailed diary. This diary was used extensively by the author, Marcus M. Wilkerson, as reference.    
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  • Virginia Andres

    The Glories of Adolescence

    Virginia Andres, Head of Middle School
    Puberty.  Adolescence.  Those two words have the power to strike fear into the hearts of adults as we remember those years- possibly with a cringe.  The poor fashion choices, awkward school dances, braces, first crushes, cliques, and a body and mind that are suddenly foreign and seemingly out of control.  It is no wonder, then, that parents approach these years with some trepidation.  How will rebellion manifest?  When will my angel turn into a moody, grumpy changeling?  How soon will this stage be over?  When I tell people that I work with adolescents, the most frequent response I get is, “How can you do that?”  My response is simple: “I love this age group.”  
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  • Angie Manning

    Settle Your Glitter

    Angie Manning, Head of Lower School
    I’m trying to get out the door for work and we’re late.  I am anxious and tense.  I’m trying to coax my then six-year-old into his jacket so we can leave.  After a fast breakfast and a struggle over his choice of shoes, my son is tense too.  He could care less that I am late for work or that I have an important parent conference before school.  He wants to stay home and snuggle with mom.  When I inform him that we can’t stay home today and we are late he falls to the floor like a wet noodle.  Feeling sad and angry, he begins to cry and throw a fit. Although the individual conflicts and situations may look different, the question is the same in most homes with children regardless of their stage of development—how do we deal with children when emotions run high? Understanding emotional intelligence begins with understanding what’s going on inside the brain.
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  • Renee Ferrerio

    The Road to College

    Renee Ferrerio, Director of College Counseling
    Back in the 80’s when I applied to college, the process was much different than it is today.  It was not a given that everybody was headed towards a post-secondary option. It was normally expected for the students at the top of the graduating class, but everyone else either got a job or considered a community college or technical school for the future. In a class of 800 graduates and 3000 students at a very large public school in South Florida, there was one guidance counselor; however, I don’t remember ever meeting with him or getting any help or advice on the college process. I took the SAT one time, in the tenth grade.
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  • Alyson Barrett

    Exercise and Academic Achievement

    Alyson Barrett, Middle School Academic Coach
    As an academic coach in the Middle School, I work with students on academic strategies to improve executive functioning skills. These are skills that allow us to plan, focus attention, organize our time, remember instructions, and juggle multiple tasks successfully. Every type of student benefits from working on these skills, and many of the strategies I use boil down to developing consistent habits that transfer to any type of class. Such habits include note-taking and using a homework journal to organize tasks and plan time. It probably doesn’t come as a surprise that note-taking and time management skills directly affect academic success.
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  • Vicki Grimm

    How Does Our Brain Really Grow?

    Dr. Victoria Grimm, Upper & Middle School French
    What is the brain? Do we really know how it functions? As educators, we need to understand it in order to help our students excel.   First of all, it is important to know that the brain is not fully developed until the age of 25.  We are born with an abundance of gray matter, connections, neurons and possibilities (Payne & Amen, 2015).  Children and young adults learn, grow and develop at an amazing speed and intensity.  The goal as educators is to help our students expand their brain to build it to a full capacity for their tomorrow.
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  • Brain Development

    How Does Our Brain Really Grow?

    Dr. Victoria Grimm, Upper & Middle School French
    What is the brain? Do we really know how it functions? As educators, we need to understand it in order to help our students excel.   First of all, it is important to know that the brain is not fully developed until the age of 25.  We are born with an abundance of gray matter, connections, neurons and possibilities (Payne & Amen, 2015).  Children and young adults learn, grow and develop at an amazing speed and intensity.  The goal as educators is to help our students expand their brain to build it to a full capacity for their tomorrow.
    Read More
  • Brooke Cutler

    Learning to Learn

    Brooke Cutler, Pre-K4 Teacher
    While it is true that in Pre-K 4 we structure our day around six different learning centers, our primary goal is to introduce children to what learning means. No-one becomes an astronaut if he/she does not know how to fly a plane. And this holds true with learning.
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  • Cici Liner

    Turning Middle School Students on to Math

    Ceci Liner, Middle School Math Teacher
    As H.P. Koirala notes, “If kids are not having fun, they’re not going to commit themselves. They’re not going to practice or learn. Fun generates achievement and focus.”

    Parents and teachers can foster enjoyment of math by creating challenges that are relevant to the students and well-matched to their skill level. Everyone likes hard, challenging activities, but they have to be geared to the individual. It is always a challenge for teachers to find problems that are hard in the right way:  the kind of work that will harness the passion of the learner to the hard work needed to master difficult material.
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  • Head of School

    The Growth Mindset

    John Elmore, Head of School
    Success in anything takes sustained, consistent effort over the period of days, weeks or even years.  Think of the shots Steph Curry has taken throughout his lifetime.  During the off-season, Curry makes at least 500 shots per day.  He says, “I only count makes….And whatever goal I set before the workout is the goal.  I won’t shortcut it.  If I play Around the World, I have to make 10 out of 13 at each of the seven spots to move on.  If I don’t, I sit at the same spot until I do.”
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  • Caption Tag

    Understanding the Role of Sports in Adolescents

    Jackie Cavallini, Upper School English Teacher and Varsity Soccer Coach
    On an old, Nebraska barn, an iron hoop was nailed in place, and my grandfather grew up tossing basketballs into it. My dad, my first and favorite coach, was a master at the backyard pop-fly. And although I was often confined to the role of spectator, I loved sitting on the roof of our woodshed as my brothers gained neighborhood infamy for their every-day-household-item obstacle courses. There was, and is, no better time than adolescence for discovering the passion for Sport.
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  • Amanda Duffy

    Keeping Your Child Engaged over the Summer

    Amanda Duffy, Kindergarten
    With the summer months quickly approaching, I am often asked by parents, “How can I keep my child engaged over the summer?” My answer always starts with keep a routine. Kids thrive on schedules and routines. Now that doesn’t mean set the timer and blow the whistle to switch activities. Set a loose schedule that works for your family and vary the activities you do.
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  • On Critical Thinking

    Guy Roberts, Upper School English

    Why do we have to learn this?
     This is one of the most interesting and challenging questions that my students ask. It’s also the beginning of critical thinking. It means that they want to look for what is true, what is of value, what is of merit for further thought. It’s asking why something is important, why it matters to know this particular bit of information, this detail or technique of presentation.
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  • Boyd Grayson

    Why Science Olympiad?

    Boyd Grayson, Science
    How many of you know the name Don Herbert? Maybe this will help….how about Mr. Wizard? Being a child of the 60’s and also labeled as a “latchkey kid”, (both mom and dad worked) the “idiot box” was a big part of my life. Yeah, I watched Gilligan’s Island, Bonanza and Star Trek but by far my favorite show was a black and white telecast that came on in the afternoon called Watch Mr. Wizard.  Science at its best! He was so far ahead of everyone else that we still use a catch phrase in the world of science education to this day that he pretty much invented. The phrase?…. “hands-on science.” I’m not educated enough in the world of psychology to know why this works, all I know is that it does.
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  • The Importance of Summer Enrichment for Youth.

    Jenell Copeland, Lower School
    Summer break can be a time to unwind by sleeping in and catching up favorite television shows or by playing for hours in the neighborhood pool. It can be an exciting time of self-discovery and exploration as well as a wonderful time for families to engage in activities together. Summer enrichment might look completely different from one family to the next. A summer filled with intensive academic classes and tutoring might be on tap for one household while renting a house on the Outer Banks to soak up the sun and waves would suit another.
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  • The Importance of International Exposure

    Heather Weeks, Spanish
    Globalism is a buzzword in the world of education. Many independent schools have shifted to international and interdisciplinary models with specific focus on developing global citizens who can act locally and think globally. Is it all trendy hype?
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  • The Value of Art in the Middle School

    Judy Browne, Middle School Visual Arts
    “I can’t draw.” “I can only draw stick people.” These are the statements I hear frequently from my middle school art students. I explain to my students that drawing is a learned process that requires much practice and that there are skills that I will teach them to help them along the way.
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  • Listening

    Kimberly S. Mason, School Counselor
    Listening seems like such a basic skill, and indeed, it is categorized as a fundamental social skill. But is listening to our tween/teen children a different kind of skill than listening to friends, coworkers, or adult family members?
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Archive

Happenings on Campus

List of 10 events.

  • Jul
    24

    Falcon Day Camp Adventurers

    Bradshaw Hall - BH Commons - Commons
  • Jul
    27

    Falcon Day Camp Explorers

    McMurray Hall - James R. Miles Atrium - LS-Atrium
  • Jul
    27

    Falcon Day Camp Explorers

    McMurray Hall - James R. Miles Atrium - LS-Atrium
  • Jul
    27

    Math Boot Camp

    Taws Hall - MS 6 - MS6
  • Jul
    27

    O'Neal Volleyball Camp

    The Hannah Center - Gym - HC-Gym
  • Jul
    27

    SAT Preparation Course

    Meyer Hall - US 2 - US2
  • Jul
    28

    Falcon Day Camp Explorers

    McMurray Hall - James R. Miles Atrium - LS-Atrium
  • Jul
    28

    Falcon Day Camp Explorers

    McMurray Hall - James R. Miles Atrium - LS-Atrium
  • Jul
    28

    Math Boot Camp

    Taws Hall - MS 6 - MS6
  • Jul
    28

    O'Neal Volleyball Camp

    The Hannah Center - Gym - HC-Gym
View All Events

Upcoming Games - Go Falcons!

O’Neal is a college preparatory private school in Moore County NC serving families in Pinehurst, Southern Pines, Whispering Pines, Sanford, West End, Aberdeen, and the surrounding areas.  The safe, nurturing environment provided offers a highly recognized early childhood education for preschool level students continuing through kindergarten and elementary school grades. Its mission is the cultivation of academic excellence, character development, and physical well-being from prekindergarten to middle school and through the high school division.  The School is one of few educational institutions among Moore County Schools that is a member of the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) – qualified for membership through its dual accreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and the Southern Association of Independent Schools (SAIS).  Whether considering an education in public schools, private schools, homeschooling, or charter schools, O’Neal is worth a visit.
Serving Pinehurst, Southern Pines, Whispering Pines, Sanford, West End, Aberdeen, and areas surrounding Moore County, NC.


The O’Neal School
3300 Airport Road
Southern Pines, NC 28387
910.692.6920

Visit our private school Facebook for preschool, kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, and high school photos.   Google+ offers a glimpse of private school life including preschool, kindergarten, and elementary school.   Follow Twitter to keep up with high school activities including athletic tournaments and sports scores.   Middle school students are prideful of postings on Instagram and become energetically engaged as a result.   Subscribe to YouTube for musical performances, convocations, commencements, and other events at The O'Neal School.